The City Sentinel

At a Rededication: ‘That Glimpse of Thee’

Darla Shelden Story by on November 16, 2019 . Click on author name to view all articles by this author. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
The Blessed Stanley Rother, honoring the martyred priest from Okarche, Oklahoma, is shown in this photo taken in the southern transept at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Oklahoma City. After months of redesign the Cathedral (including the Rother oratory) was rededicated on November 16. Enclosed in the case below the painting is a relic. Photograph by Patrick B. McGuigan, The City Sentinel

The Blessed Stanley Rother, honoring the martyred priest from Okarche, Oklahoma, is shown in this photo taken in the southern transept at the Cathedral of Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Oklahoma City. After months of redesign the Cathedral (including the Rother oratory) was rededicated on November 16. Enclosed in the case below the painting is a relic. Photograph by Patrick B. McGuigan, The City Sentinel

Dante Alighieri (G.K. Chesterton translation)

DanteAlghieriNationalGalleriesScotlandCOPY

Medieval poet Dante Allighieri (1265-1321) wrote (in Italian) the “Divine Comedy” concerning an imagined journey through Hell, Purgatory and into Heaven. British journalist and scholar G.K. Chesterton translated portions of the work, including the lines in this post. Artwork: National Gallery of Scotland

“Then was my vision mightier than man’s speech;
Speech snapt before it like a flying spell;
And memory and all that time can teach
Before that splendid outrage failed and fell.
As when one dreameth and remembereth not
Waking, what were his pleasures or his pains,
With every feature of the dream forgot,
The printed passion of the dream remains:—
Even such am I; within whose thoughts resides
No picture of that sight or any part,
Nor any memory: in whom abides
Only a happiness within the heart,
A secret happiness that soaks the heart
As hills are soaked by slow unsealing snow,
Or secret as that wind without a chart
Whereon did the wild leaves of Sibyl go.
O light uplifted from all mortal knowing,
Send back a little of that glimpse of thee,
That of its glory I may kindle glowing
One tiny spark for all men yet to be.”

 

Note: The lines above (49-72) come the concluding section of Dante Alighieri’s “Paradiso” – as translated into English by English journalist and writer G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936). M.D. Aeschliman, a great scholar of  Literature, described this sequence as  “one of the greatest passages of praise in the history of literature.” Aeschliman is publishing reflections on “praise, resistance, and consolation,” in one of  which he included the Chesterton translation. Dante, who lived 1265-1321, wrote the masterful “Divine Comedy” triology (Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso) in Italian. Pat McGuigan, founder of CapitolBeatOK and publisher of The City Sentinel newspaper, chose this selection for online posting after attending the “Rededication of The Cathedral of  Our Lady ofPerpetual Help & Dedication of the Altar” in Oklahoma City, on November 16, 2019. McGuigan  studied at Oklahoma State University, earning a B.A. with Honors, and a Master of Arts in History. He specialized in church history, writing a thesis on the life of parish priests in the diocese of Lincoln, England, during the Thirteenth Century.

G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936)

G.K. Chesterton (1874-1936)

The Cathedral of Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Oklahoma City was reopened to worshipers after months of redesign and improvements. Photo: Archdiocese of Oklahoma City.

The Cathedral of Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Oklahoma City was reopened to worshipers after months of redesign and improvements. Photo: Archdiocese of Oklahoma City.

Photograph by Patrick B. McGuigan, The City Sentinel. During a Mass of Rededication at Our Lady’s Cathedral in Oklahoma City, incense rises toward a “Triumphal Arch Mural” depicting people, including Father Stanley Rother of Okarche, who are significant to many Oklahomans. “Let my prayer be incense before You.” (Psalm 141: 2, New American Bible)

Photograph by Patrick B. McGuigan, The City Sentinel. During a Mass of Rededication at Our Lady’s Cathedral in Oklahoma City, incense rises toward a “Triumphal Arch Mural” depicting people, including Father Stanley Rother of Okarche, who are significant to many Oklahomans. “Let my prayer be incense before You.” (Psalm 141: 2, New American Bible)

 

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