The City Sentinel

Oklahoma law enforcement officers to receive training on handling dog encounters and veterinary crime scene analysis

Darla Shelden Story by on May 16, 2017 . Click on author name to view all articles by this author. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry
A member of the Animal Rescue Team carries a large dog from a neglected kennel during an animal rescue, Thursday, March 3, 2016, in Madison Co., Arkansas. (Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society of the United States)

A member of the Animal Rescue Team carries a large dog from a neglected kennel during an animal rescue, Thursday, March 3, 2016, in Madison Co., Arkansas. (Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society of the United States)

By Darla Shelden
City Sentinel Reporter

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK – Over the next week, more than 550 Oklahoma law enforcement officers will receive free training and resources regarding encounters between police and dogs.  The program will deal with issues such as understanding the process of bonding and forfeiture in cruelty cases, and veterinary forensics by experts with The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), in partnership with local organizations.

The first training was held on May 15 at the Francis Tuttle Tech Center in Oklahoma City.  The program runs through May 19 throughout Oklahoma.

“These training sessions aim to provide local law enforcement officers with a keen eye to identify animal crimes when responding to calls and the resources to address them,” said Katie Feldman, HSUS Project Manager.

Topics will include non-lethal force options when officers encounter dogs. They will learn dog behavior, canine mannerisms and body language, as well as veterinary forensics information such as crime scene analysis and animal versus human evidence recognition.

This training is accredited for eight Counsel on Law Enforcement Education Training, or CLEET, required hours.

Participants will be provided with donated equipment that is needed to accomplish what they’ll be learning during each session.

“With little to no training available to them, law enforcement is at an extreme disadvantage in the fight against animal abuse,” said John Thompson, the deputy executive director of the National Sheriffs’ Association. “The Humane Society of the United States is a leader in training law enforcement to identify and combat animal cruelty on all levels and we are excited to support The Humane State Program.”

To make this program possible, the HSUS is partnering with Oklahoma Association Chiefs of Police, Oklahoma Sheriff & Peace Officers Association, Oklahoma Sheriffs’ Association and Tomahawk Live Trap.

“We welcome the additional resources being provided to law enforcement officers in the state and hope that the increased awareness about identifying, documenting and charging violations of the state’s anti-cruelty laws will help agencies better enforce the law in the years ahead,” said Cynthia Armstrong, Oklahoma native and HSUS’ Oklahoma senior state director.

HSUS and its affiliates provide hands-on care and services to more than 100,000 animals each year.

As the leading animal advocacy organization in the nation, HSUS works to combat large-scale cruelty issues such as puppy mills, animal fighting, factory farming, seal slaughter, horse cruelty, captive hunts and the wildlife trade.

Upcoming training dates in Oklahoma include:

May 16, 2017
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Eastern Oklahoma State College
Clark Bass building
1802 College Ave.
McAlester, OK

May 17, 2017
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Cameron University
McCasland Ballroom A & B
501 SW University Dr.
Lawton, OK

May 18, 2017
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Woodward Conference Center
3401 Centennial Dr.
Woodward, OK

May 19, 2017
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Tulsa Tech Health Science Center (HSC)
Memorial Campus CSC Auditorium Seminar Room 3350
South Memorial Dr.
Tulsa, OK

For more information, contact Tara Pollock, tpollock@humanesociety.org or 301-461-2807 or visit humanesociety.org.

The Humane Society of the United States Animal Rescue Team assisted authorities on a second raid of a suspected dog fighting operation in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Photo by Kathy Milani/HSUS

The Humane Society of the United States Animal Rescue Team assisted authorities on a second raid of a suspected dog fighting operation in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Photo by Kathy Milani/HSUS

Gino Burnette, Animal Officer of Kalamazoo County Animal Services and Enforcement, removes a pit bull from its enclosure during a rescue conducted by HSUS in Kalamazoo, MI on Wed., Feb. 17, 2016. Ten dogs were removed one by one to be numbered and checked out by a veterinarian. Photo by Kendra Stanley-Mills AP Images for HSUS.

Gino Burnette, Animal Officer of Kalamazoo County Animal Services and Enforcement, removes a pit bull from its enclosure during a rescue conducted by HSUS in Kalamazoo, MI on Wed., Feb. 17, 2016. Photo by Kendra Stanley-Mills AP Images for HSUS.

 

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