The City Sentinel

Escape the heat at Science Museum Oklahoma to have fun and learn

Darla Shelden Story by on August 17, 2015 . Click on author name to view all articles by this author. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
Pi Shop, a whimsical world where young visitors can explore simple patterns, and sequences can make your dream of being inside a kaleidoscope come true at Science Museum Oklahoma’s CurioCity.  Photo provided.

Pi Shop, a whimsical world where young visitors can explore simple patterns, and sequences can make your dream of being inside a kaleidoscope come true at Science Museum Oklahoma’s CurioCity. Photo provided.

By Darla Shelden
City Sentinel Reporter

Even as summer is winding down, there is still a lot going on at Science Museum Oklahoma, located at 2100 NE 52nd St., in Oklahoma City.

A place with child-friendly, hands-on exhibits, plus an IMAX theater, planetarium and a café, the museum houses over eight acres of hands-on science experiences with thousands of space, aviation and cultural artifacts.

“Science Museum Oklahoma is the perfect place to beat the heat this August,” said Sherry Marshall, vice president of programs and outreach at Science Museum Oklahoma. “Our newest exhibit, CurioCity — pronounced ‘curiosity’ — offers 20,000 square feet of air-conditioned, hands-on science experiences.

“A village of eight neighborhoods offering a variety of activities, from paper airplanes to toy cars to water fountains, is designed to promote experimentation, exploration and discovery,” Marshall added.

“Perhaps particularly well-suited to August and adolescent minds, the ‘Grossology’ exhibit explores the human body and all its mushy, oozy, crusty, scaly and — yes — stinky habits. Based on the book ‘Grossology: The (Impolite) Science of the Human Body,’ the exhibit lets visitors explore all the less-polite attributes of the human body and may help visitors understand why air conditioning and deodorant are so vital this time of year.

“As always, Science Museum Oklahoma offers daily showings of ‘Science Live,’ and the planetarium gives guests a chance to explore the night sky free of mosquitoes and well before bedtime,” Marshall continued.

The Dome Theater features two shows this month. Through visually stunning imagery, “Journey to Space” showcases the innovative plans NASA and the space community currently are pursuing.

Also at the Dome is “Jane Goodall’s Wild Chimpanzees,” the first and only giant screen film on the queen of chimpanzee behavior.  Viewers will be touched by her passion for wildlife research and global conservation.

The main exhibit gallery features more than 100 exhibits spread over 9,600 square feet, where visitors can get hands-on experience with exhibits that demonstrate the basic principles of physics.

One such exhibit is the Segway Course, the first of its kind at a museum, where visitors of all ages can take a spin.

Designed to test strength, speed, stamina, flexibility and balance, SMO’s new exhibit, Power Play, explores human physiology and the power of the human body. This venue appeals to children ages 6 to 12, but also has a mini-ropes course for younger athletes ages birth to 4.

Destination Space offers a collection of artifacts used in the NASA’s space program, including Mercury, Gemini and Apollo spacesuits.

The Mind Games exhibit challenges the fine line between perception and reality as visitors explore a world of mind-blowing optical illusions.

The International Gymnastics Hall of Fame features collections of medals, apparatus, and awards, various pieces of sculptures, and an extensive library from the past to the present.

Early 20th century life comes alive in the M.G. Pinky Martin model train display. One thousand square feet of town and model trains hold surprises and wonder around each bend of the track.

Kid Space and Family Space prove that there is no such thing as being “too young” for science. Participants can put on a puppet show, play at the water table, make bubbles or explore painting their face.

“With those exhibits and more, Science Museum Oklahoma offers families a day of education and entertainment and a break from the sweltering heat,” Marshall stated.

General admission is $13.95 for adults, $11.95 for children up to age 12, and $11.95 for seniors over the age of 65. General admission includes all permanent exhibits at SMO.

SMO is open seven days a week. Monday – Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

For more information, visit www.sciencemuseumok.org or call (405-602-3760.

Comments are closed

Click For Western Concepts
Log in | Designed by Gabfire themes