The City Sentinel

Martin Luther King parade concludes Oklahoma City’s 2013 holiday observance

Patrick B. McGuigan Story by on January 29, 2013 . Click on author name to view all articles by this author. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
The Northeast High School Junior ROTC contingent, always popular with spectators, marched proudly in the 2013 Martin Luther King Holiday parade in downtown Oklahoma City. ROTC units from Northwest Classen and other public schools also joined the parade, which drew thousands to the Broadway Avenue parade route. The MLK holiday was marked with religious and interfaith services, community forums, the annual ringing of the Freedom Bell at the State History Center, and a special service at St. Paul's Episcopal Cathedral at  N.W. 7th and Robinson. Photos by Patrick B. McGuigan

The Northeast High School Junior ROTC contingent, always popular with spectators, marched proudly in the 2013 Martin Luther King Holiday parade in downtown Oklahoma City. ROTC units from Northwest Classen and other public schools also joined the parade, which drew thousands to the Broadway Avenue parade route. The MLK holiday was marked with religious and interfaith services, community forums, the annual ringing of the Freedom Bell at the State History Center, and a special service at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral at N.W. 7th and Robinson. Photos by Patrick B. McGuigan

 

By Patrick B. McGuigan

Associate Publisher

 

Oklahoma City’s Martin Luther King parade brought a spectacular conclusion to the 2013 observance of the federal holiday honoring the slain civil rights leader’s legacy and continuing impact in Oklahoma and American history. The event was marked both with praise for Dr. King and to President Barack Obama, who took the ceremonial oath of office as final preparations for the parade were under way.

 

Participating units came from across the metro area, including Oklahoma City, Spencer and Choctaw. Equestrian units with roots in the state’s black history concluded the event, which was led by a wide range of churches, schools and other groups.

 

In all, more than 115 units joined the official parade roster this year.

 

Church of the Living God, St. James Baptist, First Unitarian and many other religious organizations marched or rode on floats. The Peace House was among the lead units, as has been the case for most of the parade’s history.

 

“Greek” fraternal organizations – both sororities and fraternities, were out in force.

 

The Buffalo Soldiers motorcycle unit, the Ponca Nation of Oklahoma, Patriots Step group, the Men’s Associated Foundation of Oklahoma City, Boys and Girls Clubs, the Oklahoma After School Network, Jack & Jill of Oklahoma, Clear As Dance, the Marcus Garvey Charter School Panthers, the Teamsters’ local, and classic car groups (including “Old School Cruiser”) were present.

 

Many businesses brought large contingents for the holiday extravaganza, including AT&T, Cox Communications, and Twice the Cutz Salon.

 

The Spencer and Oklahoma City Fire Departments, with their sirens and bright engines, were a popular feature for children of all ages. The Oklahoma County Sheriff’ office, including equestrian officers, and the City Police brought messages of solidarity to parade-goers.

 

The parade concluded a weekend of activities, including religious services (at Corpus Christi Catholic Church, St. John Missionary Baptist, and a prayer breakfast in Midwest City) the silent march from the Freedom Center to the State Historical Society, ringing of the Freedom Bell (state’replica of the Liberty Bell), and the official remembrance at St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral.

 

 

Comments are closed

Click For Western Concepts
Log in | Designed by Gabfire themes